Name-Based Virtual Hosts With nginx on IPv6

Linode.com has recently added native IPv6 support to many of its data centers. Linode hosts the VPS that runs this blog, and it happens to reside in their Dallas data center. I was busy planning my wedding when IPv6 support reached me here, so I only got around to enabling it this week.

So now this blog is available over both IPv4 and IPv6, with a special IPv6-only version running at ipv6.kromey.us. It took a bit of doing, and a lot of trial-and-error, so let me save you some time by sharing how I succeeded. Continue reading

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This is the Proper Response to a Breach

This is quite dated now, but I just now stumbled upon the announcement of the breach of the Apache Software Foundation’s servers last April. While certainly an unfortunate event that could have been limited or even prevented by proper (and properly enforced) security procedures, their post-incident report should be a model to all for disclosure of such breaches, especially the inclusion of the details of how access was obtained, complete with candid admissions of where their own policies and security were lax enough to allow the attackers to gain further access.

It’s unfortunate that it happened, but I commend the ASF for their openness and transparency following the breach.

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Changing an Exchange User Mailbox to a Resource

Creating a resource mailbox in Exchange Server is easy. And it can make managing your organization’s resources — conference rooms, projectors, etc. — real easy, especially in avoiding double-booking.

But what if you accidentally create your resource mailbox as a user, instead? You can’t set it to auto-accept invitations, creating a management nightmare as each one has to be manually accepted on your resource’s calendar.

You can change the type of the account, but no one — Microsoft included — makes it easy to find out how! Here’s my humble effort to change that… Continue reading

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Microsoft’s Virtual Machine Manager: “Host not responding”

Microsoft’s Virtual Machine Manager, or VMM, is a slick piece of tech that smoothly enables users to control virtual machines spread out across multiple hosts, including, of course, localhost.

But what happens when VMM reports “Host not responding”, even for localhost? Continue reading

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Well, that was rough

Just upgraded my VPS server. Unfortunately, it wasn’t smooth, not by a long shot. The usual do-release-upgrade got me into quite the pickle, trying to take my out-dated Ubuntu 9.04 server to Ubuntu 9.10. I think a big part of the hassle was due to the way my VPS is hosted here on Linode.

Indeed, to get it to boot again, I had to change the kernel in my configuration profile to match the new kernel (which I had to boot into the Fennix rescue environment to find out what it was). At that point it was working, but I wasn’t eager to repeat that with a second do-release-upgrade to get onto 10.04 LTS.

So I simply reprovisioned the server, to a fresh 10.04 LTS image straight from Linode’s systems. Then things got really interesting… Continue reading

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Someday…

While skimming through Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Connection Manager v2.2 help file, I came across this in bold red text:

Note: This feature is deprecated and will be removed in a future release. Instead of importing servers, you should create a new .rdg file. The format is fairly easy to decipher and will probably be documented someday.

Someday… Probably…

Awesome!

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Strange Difference Between Debian and Ubuntu

While setting up my file server, I encountered an odd difference in what I was seeing on my Ubuntu server, versus what I was told works perfectly on Debian. Specifically, on the latter, you can mount --bind a directory and make it read-only at the same time, but on Ubuntu mount --bind explicitly cannot change the mount options, and the same operation (mount -o bind,ro ...) requires two distinct commands (mount --bind ... && mount -o remount,ro ...)!

I know Ubuntu isn’t Debian, but it is based on it! Sure, it does things “the Ubuntu way”, which isn’t necessarily “the Debian way”, but you would expect a low-level utility like mount — especially one that is common across all the *nixes! — to behave basically the same between Ubuntu and its spiritual (if not actual) upstream Debian. So very strange that it would not, very strange indeed…

Will post about my file server build and setup (including this very odd discovery) later. Just wanted to share this confusion and ask if anyone knows of any other odd differences between Debian and Ubuntu, or know of the reason for this one.

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Oh software RAID, how I love you!

Recently, my file server suffered a hard drive failure. Fortunately, as was the primary purpose of said file server, I had backups and thus lost no data. But, instead of simply replacing the failed disk, I’m taking the opportunity to upgrade and rebuild the thing, and doing a few things differently. Continue reading

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WordPress on a LEMP Stack

For years, I’ve run everything web-based on the standard LAMP (or, on occasion, WAMP) stack. I never really thought much about it, to tell you the truth: It’s what everyone seemed to be using, and it worked, so why question it?

When my server began to frequently encounter out-of-memory errors, it took me a while to come up with the solution of adding a cron job that nightly restarted MySQL and Apache, as those were my memory-gobbling culprits, the latter frequently guilty of heavy swapping. With cron job in place, though, life was good again, and I never thought much more about it.

Until completely by accident I discovered Nginx. Continue reading

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New Look!

So if you haven’t already noticed, the site is now using a new theme. I think this one feels cleaner and more friendly than the old one. What do you think? Leave your feedback in the comments, including suggestions for alternative themes if you have any.

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